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Saturday, November 22, 2014

How Some Americans Reacted to Obama's Immigration Announcement - ABC News

How Some Americans Reacted to Obama's Immigration Announcement - ABC News

Americans across the country gathered Thursday night to watch President Obama address the nation on the executive action he will take on immigration.
The president announced the most sweeping action on immigration in three decades, providing relief for an estimated 4.1 million undocumented parents of U.S. citizens and about 300,000 undocumented immigrants who came to the U.S. illegally as children.
"I know the politics of this issue are tough," Obama said during his address. "But let me tell you why I have come to feel so strongly about it. Over the past few years, I have seen the determination of immigrant fathers who worked two or three jobs without taking a dime from the government, and at risk at any moment of losing it all, just to build a better life for their kids."

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Somali-born activist honored by Adelson Educational Campus | Las Vegas Review-Journal

Somali-born activist honored by Adelson Educational Campus | Las Vegas Review-Journal

Somali-born human rights activist, politician and author Ayaan Hirsi Ali will be honored today at the 11th annual In Pursuit of Excellence Gala.
Hirsi Ali, who has written three books including a memoir and an auto­biography, will be recognized by the Dr. Miriam and Sheldon G. Adelson Educational Campus for her support of women’s rights and universal access to education. She will receive the school’s highest recognition, the In Pursuit of Excellence Award.
Hirsi Ali, 45, was raised in a conservative Muslim family and survived civil war, female mutilation and brutal beatings before she fled to the Netherlands in 1992 to escape an arranged marriage. She convinced the government there that she was in need of political asylum and was granted refugee status.
A woman who grew up as a devout believer in the tradition and teachings of Islam, Hirsi Ali after the 9/11 attacks came to believe the Quran preached brutality, bigotry and the oppression of women.
Hirsi Ali won election to the Dutch Parliament in 2003, was named one of the 100 most influential people in the world by Time Magazine in 2005 and received the Moral Courage Award from the American-Jewish Committee in 2006.
In 2004, Hirsi Ali joined a Dutch director in creating Submission, a contro­versial film about Muslim women in forced marriages who were beaten by their husbands. The director, Theo van Gogh, was shot and killed by an angry, radical Muslim man, and a letter threatening Hirsi Ali’s life was found stabbed to van Gogh’s chest.
Amid the controversy, reporters discovered Hirsi Ali had lied to government officials and was granted citizenship based on a false name and birth date. She resigned from the Dutch parliament and was stripped of her Dutch citizenship in 2006. She was offered a job with the American Enterprise Institute and moved to the United States.
The AHA Foundation, Hirsi Ali’s namesake, fights for the rights of Muslim women and girls in the United States who have been religiously and culturally oppressed. The foundation focuses on honor violence, forced marriage and female genital mutilation, which are common in some Muslim countries.
Today’s gala, which will be hosted by Sheldon Adelson, will be at 6 p.m. at The Venetian resort. All proceeds from the event will go toward the educational campus’ scholarship program that fulfills the school’s mission to never turn away a student because of financial hardship.

Family reunification allowed to Somali man, Supreme Court rules

Family reunification allowed to Somali man, Supreme Court rules


The State is entitled to cite financial costs as a reason for refusing refugees the right to bring family members to live with them in the State, the Supreme Court has ruled.
However, a Somali man whose family reunification application was refused is entitled to bring in his mother and young sister because the refusal was outside the range of proportionate decisions open to the Minister for Justice, the five-judge court also ruled.
Mr Justice Frank Clarke, giving the unanimous judgment, dismissed an appeal by the Minister against a High Court decision quashing the refusal. The High Court had found the automatic entitlement of certain family members to reunification under section 18 of the 1996 Refugee Act could not be refused on the basis the people involved would be dependent on the State for financial support.
The High Court also found no lawful or proper proportionality assessment of the “burden of supporting dependants” had taken place. The 29-year-old came as an asylum seeker in 2007 and later sought reunification with members of his family including his wife, daughter, mother and four of his siblings.

Somali author Nuruddin Farah on 'Hiding in Plain Sight' | Minnesota Public Radio News

Somali author Nuruddin Farah on 'Hiding in Plain Sight' | Minnesota Public Radio News

Nuruddin Farah: Novelist

Author Nuruddin Farah is out with his 12th novel, "Hiding in Plain Sight." The story revolves around an African family facing extreme tragedy and grief.
The book begins with a Somali UN official dying in an explosion shortly after receiving threatening notes from a terrorist.
Next we meet the dead man's half-sister, a glamorous photographer named Bella. She lives a life of sophisticated pleasures, in Rome and other places, but her brother's demise sinks her deeply in grief. Since his wife has long-ago abandoned the kids, Bella puts Rome and lovers behind her, packs her bags, and cameras, and heads to Nairobi to pick up her niece and nephew at boarding school. In Farah's words, she feels "she is answering a call to serve, almost a religious calling."

Nuruddin, born in Somalia, joins The Daily Circuit to talk about his latest novel. He told NPR about telling the story of his native country through fiction:
"I go to Somalia a great deal, perhaps, in part, to feed my imagination and also to be in touch with the experiences that other Somalis go through on a daily basis," he said. "But, in terms of writing as a writer, there's always a daily challenge when one goes into one's studio to write. And the bravest thing, I think, for a writer is to face an empty page. Almost everything else is less challenging until it comes to ... someone close to you -- as close as Basra was to me -- fall[ing] a victim to terrorism."

Soma Oil

SOil & Gas CEO On Somalia Oil Prospects

To Watch click this link: http://www.youtube.com/embed/L0wT3m76fDA?enablejsapi=1&autohide=2&controls=1&disablekb=0&fs=1&start=0&loop=0&rel=0&showinfo=0&theme=dark&modestbranding=1&wmode=transparent

Friday, November 21, 2014

Actor who played Somali pirate in Hollywood blockbuster starring Tom Hanks is jailed for brutal gang attack - Manchester Evening News

Actor who played Somali pirate in Hollywood blockbuster starring Tom Hanks is jailed for brutal gang attack - Manchester Evening News

An actor who played a Somali pirate in a Hollywood blockbuster led a gang who battered a man so severely he suffered a brain haemorrhage.
Mohammed Abdi had a minor role in the 2013 Tom Hanks movie Captain Phillips - an action film the sentencing judge said he had seen ‘more than once’.
But away from the cameras Abdi was part of a hotheaded mob who ambushed rivals as they were coming out of south Manchester takeaways.
In the first attack, the victim was on his way out of Kansas Fried Chicken at Wilmslow Road, Rusholme, when his attackers, led by Abdi, pulled up in a Nissan Micra and set upon him.
The man was kicked into unconsciousness and suffered a fractured cheekbone, before being bundled into a car, driven off, and released after an hour.
Prosecutor Katy Jones said Abdi had previously been involved in a fraud case with the victim, and called him a ‘grass’ before the attack, at 6am, March 2, 2013.
The victim, who suffered a brain haemorrhage afterwards, told police he had been ‘paraded’ through the streets while unconscious, although this has not been proven.
At 10am on August 17 this year, Abdi also took part in a gang assault on a man suspected of insulting his friend in the McFresh bakery at Claremont Road, Moss Side.
The victim was cut to the arm after Abdi attacked him with a bottle in front of horrified staff and customers.
David Temkin, defending, said there was ‘another side’ to Abdi, who had a well-paid sales job and had enjoyed the ‘privileged experience’ of nine weeks filming in Morocco after being cast as in Captain Phillips, which tells the story of an oil tanker boarded by pirates.
Judge Martin Rudland, sentencing, said: “Was he in the capsule at the end when the Navy Seals were trying to get in? When I watched this film I thought where have they got these fantastic Somali actors from? They are extremely convincing.”
Jailing Abdi, 29, of Princess Road, Moss Side, for two-and-half years after he admitted two GBH charges, the judge said it was a ‘great shame’ to see him in the dock for the ‘deplorable’ attacks after his big screen achievement.
Describing the first incident, Judge Rudland said: “It’s a whisker between behaviour of this sort and death, but you were completely unmindful of that. Even when you got him unconscious on the pavement, lying there like a rag doll, you go about that appalling display of dragging, moving and shifting the dead weight of his body to get him into a motorcar.”
Abdi’s accomplices in that attack, Mohammed Omar Ali, 33, of Stockport Road, Longsight, and Hamid Hassan, 27, of Acomb Street, Hulme, were jailed for two years after admitting GBH.
His accomplices in the second attack, Ismail Warsama, 30, of Hammersmith, London, and Abdi Arteh, of Princess Road, Moss Side, got 12-month suspended sentences after admitting affray. Warsama has 180 hours unpaid work and a programme requirement, while Arteh has 150 unpaid work, a programme requirement and 12-months supervision.

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

Feature: Somali boy's painful struggle in street | Shanghai Daily

Feature: Somali boy's painful struggle in street | Shanghai Daily

Three years ago, Mohamed Hussein was a determined school boy who wanted to be either a doctor or a civil engineer when he stayed in Mama Halima orphanage school in Mogadishu. Now the 13-year-old, however, sees his future as dark.

Hussein was taken to Mama Halima school five years ago, where he was received as an orphan, given primary care and was accommodated, but it lasted only two years before he ended up in the street to struggle for survival.
Abused, mistreated and regularly beaten by both the older street boys and members of the public, Hussein's difficult life in the street is a legacy of cycle of violent war that torn his family apart and made him a lost boy.
Today, Hussein lives under Politecnico Bridge in Waberi district in Mogadishu, with dozens of other street children whose lives depend on sniffing glues and trashes dumped by the restaurants.
"I am a street boy, I am nothing," Hussein said, responding a question about his name and age. "I am a glue sniffer. I am an orphan," he continued.
The difficult journey that brought him to the street began in 2010, when stray bullets killed his mother in his home in the capital's Hawlwadag district. His father was not in Mogadishu when his mother was killed, and he was told that his father migrated to Yemen and had never communicated back.
More than 5,000 children under 18 live in the streets of Mogadishu without primary care, and are victimized by conservative civilian members, invisible organized groups and armed militia.
"I saw a lot of my friends killed by street violence. Some lost their hands and legs because of road-side explosions, and I saw soldiers raping young street girls," said Hussein. "There is only a dark future ahead of me."
Over the years, Hussein saw unidentified persons visiting the street children overnight and pressuring them to be informants for them. He also regularly sees armed militia exploiting the poor boys and using them for illegal businesses.
"Sometimes armed militia comes to the older boys and they ask them to follow them; they use them to search the people in the dark alleys when they commit robbery," he said. "They give you some money to buy food and glue for motivation."
Hussein also experienced some of his friends in the streets arrested by either police or national security forces for interrogations related to activities they were forced to involve by what he calls "ruthless" militia men.
Hussein covers his daily life with restaurant remains dumped in the trash, and sometimes he goes to the market to offer the shop owners a service of removing trash in exchange of bread and tea.
He refused to say how many times he was abused, but he said that he is not spared from the consecutive abuses committed by the street children themselves.
"Coming to the street is not easy, I used to cry for help and no one was coming to help me. Everyone who came to the street before me wanted to abuse me, but as days counted I got an ideal big brother. He protects me and I serve for him," Hussein described. "No mercy in the street, the most painful night is when you don't have glue to sniff."
Before the September presidential elections in 2012, Hussein met the current president Hassan Sheikh Mohamud who visited the street children as a presidential candidate then.
"The president was leading a campaigning team; they cleaned here for us and gave us some food and T-shirts," Hussein recalled. "He promised to give us home, we are still waiting."
The Somali constitution primarily guarantees the child protection, but due to the missing of all public services in the country, there is no current policy that focuses on the care of the thousands of homeless children living in the streets of Mogadishu.
Hassan Yusuf, a child protection official of Centre for Peace and Human Rights (CPHR), said that the street children increased for the last 6 years in Somalia.
"I believe the number of the street children is more than 6,000 to 10,000, because the violent war against Al-Shabaab and the severe famine of 2011 caused thousands of children to lose their parents and they live in the streets without caregivers," said Yusuf.
"Over the years, they were recruited as fighters, girls were sexually assaulted, boys as well and they are seen as bad people," said Yusuf, adding that there are no kindergartens and available orphanage centres, and the Somali government is yet to place any childcare program in place.
Nevertheless, Hussein called for the Somalia government and the international community to "turn their kindly eyes on the kids in the streets".
"I need to sleep a safe place; I need to go to school; I need eat and play without fear; I need to be like the children that have their parents," he said. "I request everyone including the government, the international agencies and good Samaritans to give us hope and help us."